For patients with the herpes simplex-1 virus (HSV-1), there are just a handful of drugs available to treat the painful condition that can affect the eyes, mouth and genitals. If patients develop resistance to these drugs, there are even fewer choices left to treat the infection, which lasts for life. Researchers have now identified a small drug molecule that can clear the HSV-1 infection in the cells of the cornea -- the clear outer layer of the eyeball -- and works completely differently than the currently-available drugs, making it a promising potential option for patients who have developed resistance.