Shweta Sharma, 30, smiles as she feels the baby inside her kicking. Less than a year ago, the south Delhi resident and her husband had started looking up adoption agencies, having given up hopes for a biological child.Sharma had not only failed to conceive despite two costly cycles of In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) but also spent a "nightmarish" week hospitalized because of ovarian hyperstimulation -a side effect of multiple fertility injections. "Doctors had to drain out the fluid that had filled in my abdomen. It was so painful," she recounts. But when Sharma learnt about 'natural IVF', a method with no drugs or jabs, she decided to try one last time. Two weeks after the treatment, Sharma missed her period and a test confirmed pregnancy . "I still can't believe it," says the public relations professional, who is due in November. Sharma is among a growing number of women opting for natural cycle IVF. This, incidentally, is the method by which the world's first 'test tube baby' Louise Brown was conceived in 1978. The treatment was abandoned soon after because of its poor success rate and replaced by the drug-intensive IVF that is typically used today because of better results. Every year, more than 3.7 million babies are born worldwide with the help of fertility treatments.

 
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